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A09019 Summary:

BILL NOA09019A
 
SAME ASSAME AS S07171-A
 
SPONSORGunther
 
COSPNSRLupardo, Barrett, Byrne
 
MLTSPNSR
 
Add 207-a, Pub Health L
 
Relates to impact studies on tick-borne diseases; requires the department to issue a report examining the mental health impacts of tick-borne diseases and blood-borne pathogens on mental illness rates in endemic areas of the state.
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A09019 Memo:

NEW YORK STATE ASSEMBLY
MEMORANDUM IN SUPPORT OF LEGISLATION
submitted in accordance with Assembly Rule III, Sec 1(f)
 
BILL NUMBER: A9019A
 
SPONSOR: Gunther
  TITLE OF BILL: An act to amend the public health law, in relation to impact studies on tick-borne diseases   PURPOSE OR GENERAL IDEA OF BILL: Amends the public health law to provide for a study on the mental health impacts of infectious diseases and blood-borne pathogens.   SUMMARY OF PROVISIONS: Section 1 of the bill amends the public health law to add a new section 207-a to provide for an infectious disease and blood-borne pathogen impact study to be conducted by the Department of Health, in conjunction with the Office of Mental Health. Section 2 of the bill provides for the effective date.   JUSTIFICATION: When promoting public health initiatives, health care providers and advocates may not immediately connect the emergence of infectious diseases and blood-borne pathogens with mental illness. However, research has emerged that suggests that these types of infections may play an important role in the development of neuropsychiatric condi- tions, mood disorders, and a variety of mental health conditions in infected patients. In August 2017, the Senate Majority Task Force on Lyme and Tick-Borne Diseases, in conjunction with the Senate Standing Committee on Health, convened a public hearing to discuss the ongoing concerns related to the Lyme and tick-borne disease epidemic in New York. Testimony from public health experts, as well as mental health professionals, noted that there were psychiatric symptoms related to these types of infections that could have long-term impacts on the patient's health as well as standard of living. Given the prevalence of certain infectious diseases in New York State, including Lyme and tick-borne diseases, it is imperative that the State approach this epidemic from a holistic perspective that accounts for the mental health consequences of these types of infections. This informa- tion could be vital to the way in which diagnosis and treatment are approached by health care practitioners, and inform medical debates about the causes of mental illness in infectious disease patients, including organic causes, reaction effects, and drug interactions. As such, this legislation will require that the Department of Health, in conjunction with the Office of Mental Health, conduct an impact study considering how tick-borne diseases and blood-borne pathogens may have correlations with mental illness in infected individuals.   PRIOR LEGISLATIVE HISTORY: New bill.   FISCAL IMPLICATIONS FOR STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS: None.   EFFECTIVE DATE: This act shall take effect immediately.
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A09019 Text:



 
                STATE OF NEW YORK
        ________________________________________________________________________
 
                                         9019--A
 
                   IN ASSEMBLY
 
                                    January 12, 2018
                                       ___________
 
        Introduced by M. of A. GUNTHER, LUPARDO, BARRETT, BYRNE -- read once and
          referred to the Committee on Mental Health -- reported and referred to
          the Committee on Ways and Means -- committee discharged, bill amended,
          ordered reprinted as amended and recommitted to said committee
 
        AN  ACT to amend the public health law, in relation to impact studies on
          tick-borne diseases

          The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and  Assem-
        bly, do enact as follows:
 
     1    Section  1.  The  public health law is amended by adding a new section
     2  207-a to read as follows:
     3    § 207-a. Tick-borne diseases and blood-borne  pathogen  impact  study.
     4  1.  The  department,  in  conjunction  with  the  commissioner of mental
     5  health, shall issue a report examining  the  mental  health  impacts  of
     6  tick-borne diseases and blood-borne pathogens on mental illness rates in
     7  endemic areas of the state. Such report shall include but not be limited
     8  to:
     9    (a) Considerations of how Lyme, tick-borne illnesses, and other blood-
    10  borne  pathogens  or  vector-borne  diseases  may have correlations with
    11  mental illness in infected individuals;
    12    (b) Populations at-risk including those individuals  with  occupations
    13  outdoors and/or increased exposure to vectors;
    14    (c)  Diagnostic indicators of mental illness that can be used as guid-
    15  ance for healthcare providers and mental health practitioners;
    16    (d) Historical considerations of infection rates  and  mental  illness
    17  indicators  that  may  have  gone undiagnosed or misdiagnosed in endemic
    18  areas; and
    19    (e) Recommendations for intervention and coordinated care for individ-
    20  uals who exhibit mental illness symptoms as well as those who have  both
    21  physical and mental health indicators.
    22    2.  Such  report  shall be submitted to the temporary president of the
    23  senate and the speaker of the assembly no later than October first,  two
    24  thousand  nineteen. The department and the commissioner of mental health
    25  may engage stakeholders in the compilation of the report, including  but
    26  not  limited  to, medical research institutions, health care practition-
    27  ers, mental health providers, county and  local  government,  and  advo-
    28  cates.
    29    § 2. This act shall take effect immediately.
 
         EXPLANATION--Matter in italics (underscored) is new; matter in brackets
                              [ ] is old law to be omitted.
                                                                   LBD13692-04-8
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