•  Summary 
  •  
  •  Actions 
  •  
  •  Committee Votes 
  •  
  •  Floor Votes 
  •  
  •  Memo 
  •  
  •  Text 
  •  
  •  LFIN 
  •  
  •  Chamber Video/Transcript 

A07524 Summary:

BILL NOA07524A
 
SAME ASSAME AS S07321-A
 
SPONSORPalmesano
 
COSPNSRBarclay, Tague, Fitzpatrick, Angelino, Ashby, Blankenbush, Brabenec, Brown, Byrne, Byrnes, DeStefano, Durso, Friend, Gallahan, Gandolfo, Giglio JA, Giglio JM, Goodell, Hawley, Jensen, Lawler, Lemondes, Manktelow, McDonough, Mikulin, Miller B, Miller M, Montesano, Morinello, Norris, Ra, Reilly, Salka, Schmitt, Simpson, Smith, Smullen, Tannousis, Walczyk, Walsh
 
MLTSPNSR
 
Add §66-s, Pub Serv L
 
Directs the public service commission in consultation with NYSERDA to conduct a full cost benefit analysis of the technical and economic feasibility of renewable energy systems in the state of New York and to compare such directly with other methods of electricity generation within nine months after the effective date and every four years thereafter.
Go to top    

A07524 Actions:

BILL NOA07524A
 
05/13/2021referred to energy
11/19/2021amend and recommit to energy
11/19/2021print number 7524a
01/05/2022referred to energy
Go to top

A07524 Memo:

NEW YORK STATE ASSEMBLY
MEMORANDUM IN SUPPORT OF LEGISLATION
submitted in accordance with Assembly Rule III, Sec 1(f)
 
BILL NUMBER: A7524A
 
SPONSOR: Palmesano
  TITLE OF BILL: An act to amend the public service law, in relation to directing the public service commission to conduct a full cost benefit analysis of the technical and economic feasibility of renewable energy systems in the state of New York and to compare such directly with other methods of electricity generation   PURPOSE: This bill directs the Public Service Commission to conduct a full cost- benefit analysis of the various technical and economic aspects (includ- ing secondary and tertiary effects) of renewable energy systems in New York State and the deployment thereof.   SUMMARY OF PROVISIONS: Section 1 amends the Public Service Law by adding a new section (66-s) to direct that a supplemental study of the costs, benefits and technical economic feasibility of meeting Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act (CLCPA) targets be conducted within a specific timeframe. Subsection 1 describes the timeframe, both initial and recurring, for this study. Subsection 2 directs that such study shall include a full cost/benefit analysis assessing the following, including, but not limited to: *The current ,state of technology in place for electric generation as of the date of the study, as well as new and emerging generation methods; *The impact of CLCPA renewable energy target compliance on electricity wholesale prices, delivery rates and total bills that energy consumers in this state will pay, including indirect energy costs. This analysis would include the impacts of subsidies to site land-based and offshore renewable energy projects, the build-out of the electric infrastructure to receive and transmit renewable power, subsidies of energy storage projects, and the addition of new loads associated with deep electrifi- cation efforts in the residential, commercial, industrial and transpor- tation sectors. This analysis shall address both short-term and longterm maintenance costs; *Direct and indirect costs associated with the transition to heating and cooling provided by heat pumps powered by renewable energy systems; *The current civilian state of the art in nuclear reactor technology and the role such technology could play in the transition to a cleaner, more reliable, and more resilient energy portfolio in New York state; *The impact of renewable energy systems on the reliability of the elec- tric system in this state. Among other things, the study shall address voltage sags and how reliability shall be maintained when solar and wind resources are not generating power. Such study also shall address how reliability will be maintained if fast-ramping gas-fired generation is phased out; *Costs and logistical issues associated with end-of-life disposal of renewable energy system components; *Costs (both short-term and long-term) associated with building-out and maintaining adequate energy storage/battery capacity for periods when renewable energy systems are intermittent; *Direct and indirect trans- portation costs associated with such matters as charging station infras- tructure, a moratorium on gas pipeline construction, and over-the-road transport of goods, such as perishable agricultural products; *The impact of CLCPA compliance on natural gas market prices, delivery rates and total bills that energy consumers in this state will pay. The analysis shall address both short-term and longterm maintenance costs; *The impact of CLCPA compliance on the reliability of the natural gas system in this state and especially its ability to support manufacturing processes for which today there are no known replacement fuels. Among other scenarios, the study shall examine the extent to which: many manufacturers utilize and depend upon natural gas for process purposes; restaurant and food service industries rely extensively on natural gas service for cooking, due to the ability of gas ranges and ovens to heat foods More evenly than their electric counterparts; natural gas is used for heating in 46% of households in the Northeast; and reliable and affordable heating and other services supplied by natural gas will be maintained for all of these energy consumers if natural gas use is phased out in New York; *Clarification of the impact of CLCPA compliance on industrial use of fossil fuels; and *Examination of the land use implications of major renewable electric generating facilities in the State, both from the standpoint of tourism and this state's tourism-based economic sectors, and potential effects on the viability of agriculture in this state. Subsection 3 directs that the study be built upon expertise already at the disposal of the PSC, DPS and Climate Action Council. Subsection 4 directs the Department of Public Service to contract with an independent, competitively selected consultant to undertake the study. Subsection 5 directs the Department to consult with any outside entities necessary to assist with the study. Subsection 6 directs that a report be published containing the study's findings, and directs that said report be transmitted to Legislative leadership within a specific time-frame. Subsection 7 authorizes the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) and the New York Power Authority (NYPA) to make voluntary contributions to the study, if desired. Subsection 8 provides the authority for, and a timeframe for, the promulgation of regulations based upon recommendations contained within the report. Section 2 provides the effective date for this legislation.   JUSTIFICATION: As the Climate Action Council (CAC) continues its work on the implemen- tation of the Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act (CLCPA) there have been many projections regarding the significant economic and fiscal implications of full CLCPA implementation; some estimates show it will cost individuals, families, farmers and businesses billions of dollars per year through increased taxes, utility/electric rates/ bills and home and business conversion and retrofit costs. History has shown us time and again that attempts to capitalize upon and/or mandate the use of emergent technologies always results in belat- ed realizations that such technological developments aren't the unal- loyed goods they were originally purported to be; Mandating technolog- ical transitions based upon soundbites and the 24/7 news cycle (and, substantially, little else) is shortsighted and unwise. Green technolo- gies are anything but green in teinis of the materials, costs, and meth- ods used in construction and production, but currently any discussion of adverse economic, environmental and societal impacts from these technol- ogies is met with derision and/or the attempted personal & professional destruction of those who bring these issues forward. Given the wide-ranging impact the CLCPA will have on families and busi- nesses, it has become clear that a full, transparent, and detailed proc- ess must take place to provide the public with a full accounting of the true and actual financial costs the full implementation of the CLCPA will have on state residents and businesses. While the objective of cleaner air, cleaner water and a more healthful environment is laudable, such objectives must be balanced with the ener- gy needs of a stable,' thriving first-world economy, which is and will remain dependent upon both a diverse energy mix and a guaranteed, affordable and reliable supply of on-demand electrical power. The need for, and maintenance of, a reliable electrical grid and the sources to supply it are only going to increase over time, and, heretofore insuffi- cient attention has been paid to how reliance upon renewables (specif- ically wind- and solar-powered generation facilities) will affect the reliability and cost of the electrical grid as well as land use across the state, in addition to many other factors at play. With these concerns-in mind, it is essential that the State require that the totality of its efforts to comply with CLCPA mandates undergo a complete cost/benefit analysis, undertaken by a third-party independent consultant, before. recommendations to implement the CLCPA mandates take effect.   LEGISLATIVE HISTORY: New bill   FISCAL IMPLICATIONS: Minimal administrative costs to the State pursuant to contracting for a third party consultant to undertake the study.   EFFECTIVE DATE: This act shall take effect immediately.
Go to top