Tix Fix: Local Court Jurisdiction Bill Passed to Enforce Parking Tickets

June 24, 2019

Assemblyman Steve Otis (D- Rye) and Senator Anna Kaplan (D- Port Washington) are pleased to announce the passage of their bill, A.2333/S.5078, that will help to reconcile conflicting court decisions governing the ability of local governments to enforce parking tickets.

Those decisions affecting the Hudson Valley and Long Island brought into question the amount of detail required on a parking ticket to give notice and whether written tickets gave local courts jurisdiction over recipients of parking tickets. The lack of clarity created by these court decisions has interfered with the ability of local governments to enforce parking tickets, collect fines, and control traffic and parking in their communities.

Assemblyman Steve Otis stated, “This legislation will provide drivers increased notice of the details of a parking violation and give local governments clear jurisdiction, through their courts, to enforce parking tickets. The ability of local governments to manage limited parking and keep spaces available for shoppers and businesses will be restored.”

Senator Anna M. Kaplan said, “Anytime there is confusion or ambiguity in the law, it creates a situation where that law can be applied unevenly, and that’s unfair to people who play by the rules. This common sense fix will ensure that all who receive parking tickets will be treated the same, and that municipalities are able to properly enforce their own local laws.”

Over a number of years, various courts in New York State have reached divergent decisions on the power of municipalities to properly enforce parking tickets as accusatory instruments. Due to these varied rulings many municipalities cannot compel their citizens to pay their parking tickets.

This bill addresses these issues by requiring additional details on parking tickets.

This will give adequate notice to violators and designate parking tickets as “accusatory instruments” making jurisdiction over the ticket clear. These changes restore the validity of parking tickets throughout the state and ensure the ability of local courts and municipal governments to enforce local parking rules.